Influential Women in HVAC

In terms of background, gender, and ethnicity, the HVAC field values diversity. Despite this, there has always been a lack of women who have chosen to make it their profession. To show how influential women have been in this industry, we’d like to talk about Alice Parker, Margaret Ingles, and our very own Olive Lewellyn.

Influential Women in Heating and Cooling History

 

Alice Parker

Alice H. Parker patented the natural gas central heating system. Natural gas as a fuel for a furnace was a breakthrough idea in the 1920s, paving the way for the central heating systems we use today.

Influential Women in HVAC - Alice Parker

People relied on coal or wood as their primary source of heat at the time. While furnaces and the concept of central heating date back to the Roman Empire, science made little progress in the years that followed, and the heating technologies used at the end of the nineteenth century were still quite primitive.

Parker’s patent for her heating system was filed on December 23, 1919. Cool air was taken into the furnace, then passed through a heat exchanger, which distributed heated air to individual rooms of a house via ducts. Parker’s design was unusual in that it used natural gas instead of coal or wood.

Alice H. Parker was inspired by the fact that her fireplace was ineffective at keeping her home warm during the chilly New Jersey winters. Her idea was useful since it eliminated the need for people to go outdoors and chop or purchase wood. By reducing the need to leave a burning fireplace on all night, it also reduced the risk of house or building fires caused by heating systems. Her idea that natural gas and ducts could be used to heat different portions of a house was a big step toward the heating systems used today.

She was an African American woman who succeeded at a time when black women had few opportunities to showcase their abilities. Her patent was filed before the Civil Rights and Women’s Liberation movements, making her accomplishments all the more remarkable because they knocked through countless barriers for black women of her generation.

Margaret Ingles

In 1920, Margaret Ingles became the first woman to earn a master’s degree in mechanical engineering. She graduated from University of Kentucky. Ingles made a number of significant contributions to heating and cooling. The most significant was the development of the effective temperature scale for home comfort. It took into account humidity and airflow, going beyond just a figure on a thermometer, to provide a measurement of how the temperature actually feels. This was made possible by another of her inventions, the sling psychrometer, which detected moisture in the air and offered reliable humidity readings. Most new homes didn’t come equipped with air conditioning until the late 1960’s, but Ingles played a key role in the development of today’s air conditioning system.

Olive Lewellyn

In 1946, Olive Lewellyn took over Boonville Natural Gas Corporation with her late husband Lawrence Young. When her husband passed away suddenly a few years later, Mrs. Lewellyn was left with two small children to raise and a company to run alone at a time when there were very few women business owners and almost no women executives in the natural gas or heating industries, especially in the rural Midwest.

There were no air conditioners at the time, so the company started working on heating. It was just after World War II and there were coal furnaces everywhere. Using these coal furnaces got coal dust all over the house. But thanks to Alice Parker’s discoveries, Bryant had a solution. They created a cast iron conversion burner in order to retrofit coal furnaces to burn cleaner natural gas instead. Though these conversion burners did not have the efficiency modern natural gas furnaces have, Mrs. Lewellyn’s customers seemed to appreciate a break from the coal dust.

She continued to come to work every day up until her health started to fail in late 2004. Mrs. Lewellyn was an outstanding business owner and a woman well ahead of her time. Her commitment to excellent customer service was instilled in the company from the very beginning and is still our driving force today.

For more about how Olive Lewellyn’s legacy lives on in our family-owned and operated company today, please read About Us.

Why Does My Furnace Smell Bad?

Why Does My Furnace Smell Bad?

Chilly weather has arrived, and you’re ready to turn on the heat in order to keep your home warm. However, you may detect a strange odor coming from your furnace that wasn’t there before you turned it on. If you find yourself thinking, “Ew, why does my furnace smell bad?” then read on to find the answer.

It’s typical to notice a weird odor coming from your furnace, especially if you haven’t used it in a long time, but it’s crucial to distinguish between dust and debris or a significant problem.

You can always count on us if you have any concerns! Since 1946, BNG has provided heating repair, maintenance, and furnace replacement/installation services. When a furnace emits an unusual odor or you have questions about other frequent heater issues, we know what to look for.

Reasons for a Bad-Smelling Furnace

In general, if your furnace has been sitting dormant for some time, a little odor is not something to be concerned about. The following are the most typical causes of a funny-smelling furnace:

  • Dirty furnace – If a furnace hasn’t been cleaned out before it’s turned on, dust and debris burn off, so if the scent is slightly dusty and burning, it’s likely the result of the dust burning off.
  • Mold – If the stench coming from your heater isn’t only dusty, but also musty, like an old damp towel, there may be mold trapped in the furnace as well as dust. Mold can grow in a furnace’s filter, A/C coil, or humidifier panel, if one is installed.
  • Trapped toys or an unnoticed spill – If the burning smell is similar to that of burned plastic or an electrical short, it could be the result of a toy that became stuck in your vent or a spilt food or drink near a vent. If you’ve checked your vents for foreign objects but haven’t found anything, call us right away for assistance, as the electrical odor coming from your furnace could be dangerous! (812) 858-4000
  • Clogged furnace filter – An oily odor from your furnace could indicate a problem, such as a dirty filter that has to be replaced. If the smell lingers after the filter has been replaced, you should have our experienced professionals inspect your HVAC system to ensure the problem isn’t serious.

How to Fix a Bad-Smelling Furnace

To alleviate an unpleasant odor emanating from your furnace, you can perform the following general maintenance:

  1. Before turning on the heating unit, clean any dust or debris that has accumulated on the coils, heater exchange, or inside.
  2. Replace the furnace filter.
  3. Check for trash and dust in the ducts. You can use a vacuum cleaner to clean out your ductwork.

Smells That Indicate a Major Furnace Issue

Although most smells from a furnace do not indicate a problem, you should keep an eye out for a handful that could indicate a greater problem. The following are a few scents to be wary of and address right away:

  • Electrical burning odor or metallic odor – Heat accumulation in your furnace might cause an electrical burning odor or a metallic odor. Internal components of your furnace may be damaged, such as electrical wires or worn rubber pieces, and the heat from the furnace is increasing the odor. To avoid further damage or a fire, turn off the system immediately and contact us as soon as possible.
  • Smoke coming from the furnace — If your chimney or vents are blocked, you may notice smoke or hear a smoke detector go off as a result of smoke coming from the heater. The best course of action is to turn off your furnace and then call us for a professional diagnosis.
  • Rotten egg odor — If you smell rotten eggs after turning on your furnace, you may have a gas leak. This could be a mild or strong odor; nevertheless, if it persists, turn off your system and contact the gas supplier. They may send someone to assist you.
  • Chemical odor from furnace – Do not disregard a chemical odor in your home after turning on your heater. If you detect a formaldehyde-like odor, the heat exchanger component may be broken. This requires your rapid attention to avoid a fire or carbon monoxide poisoning.

We can help you!

If you smell dangerous odors when you first switch on your heater, it’s time to figure out what’s wrong and fix it as soon as possible. BNG’s skilled specialists can assist you! To learn more about our maintenance and repair services for homeowners and businesses in the Boonville, Evansville, Newburgh, and Richland areas, contact us now.

Maintenance technician holding gauges.

HVAC Maintenance Will Save You Time and Money

They say that the kitchen is the heart of the home. If that’s true, we would say your HVAC system is the pulse. Your HVAC system works tirelessly to ensure your optimal comfort. Without an adequate heating and cooling system, your entire house could become virtually unlivable at certain times of the year. That’s why proper, regular home HVAC maintenance is so important.

In short, it’s essential to make sure your heating and cooling system gets the proper care and maintenance it needs for high-quality performance and longevity. Taking a few basic steps for proper care can even eliminate future replacement or repair costs. Plus, it’s not hard!

Here are a few obvious steps to get you started on easy home HVAC maintenance:

Change Your Filters Regularly

The temptation to put off replacing filters has hit even the most dedicated of homeowners. We recommend changing your filters every 3 months for the best home HVAC maintenance results. This is the number one thing you can do to keep your home system functioning properly.

Clean filters reduce wear and tear on the blower components, increase the air quality in your home and help reduce airborne allergies such as dust and pet dander. If you find that replacing the filters every 3 months isn’t sufficient, don’t be afraid to swap them out more often.

Do your research and find the correct filters as using ones that aren’t a good fit for your unit can reduce the airflow to your system. This will create an unnecessary strain that will reduce its efficiency. If you have an air purification system or other aftermarket accessories, like a humidifier, follow the manufacturer’s instructions for changing those filters. Don’t forget, even ductless systems have filters that need to be changed.

Clean Your Ductwork

Ductwork is an often neglected part of home HVAC maintenance because it’s out of sight and often, out of mind! Ductwork needs to be cleaned every 4-6 years depending on the dust and allergen factor of your local area and your desired level of inside air quality. Dust bunnies seem to spontaneously reproduce in these hidden spaces and then get blown out with the heat or AC and can cover your home in dust and allergens.

It’s especially noticeable if you have hardwood floors as carpets easily hide the level of dust that is really adding up. A professional is usually the best for the job, as they have the proper equipment to easily and safely clean even the hardest to reach spots in the enclosed ducts.

Check Your Outside Condenser Unit For Debris

Keeping overgrown vegetation, such as bushes and piles of blown leaves, clear from your AC condenser unit is key to keeping the airflow intake free of any debris and working at top performance. Be aware that pollen or seeds from certain trees, like cottonwoods or the helicopter seeds from maple trees, are notorious for clogging outdoor AC condensing units.

Take off the exterior cover and clean seeds from the interior. An unexpected home HVAC maintenance issue can also arise if dryer vents are pointed towards your condenser. Dryer lint can be blown into the unit causing loads of problems that could result in an expensive replacement. Ensure that the vent is pointed away from the condenser.

Inspect Your Evaporator Coil’s Drain Pipe

Your AC condenser drain pipe can hold a myriad of issues, including blockages of algae and mold. Keeping it clean is a critical part of home HVAC maintenance. During the wet weather months of spring and summer, this can be a very common problem.

First, locate your drain line. It is usually a white, grey or black one-inch PVC pipe that typically drains outside near the condenser unit. Inspect it to see if there are blockages or build up inside the pipe. Then, using a wet-dry vacuum hose to suck up any plugged areas out of the line. If super duty help is needed, pouring a liberal amount of bleach through the drain pipe can help clear out any biological matter as well. Finally, don’t forget to remove the paper filter from the wet/dry vac so it doesn’t get ruined in this process.

Clean and Straighten The Fins On Your Outdoor Unit

Carefully remove the exterior outer cover of your condenser unit and brush it off or use a vacuum with a brush attachment to remove all outside dirt or vegetation that may be built up. Then, gently use a garden hose and spray from the inside out through the fins to clear any built-up dirt or debris that may be restricting the airflow. Make sure that the pressure you use is just enough to do the job, strong pressure can damage the fin.

Bent fins can happen from simple accidental bumps with the lawnmower or a yard toy. More serious incidents, such as a bad hail storm, can create significant damage. This can cause blocked airflow which will always add to more wear and tear on your unit, shorten it’s the life span and cause higher utility bills. Fins are easily bent back into place using a tool called a “fin comb,” which are sold online from HVAC retailers. Be sure and unplug the unit before working on any kind of home HVAC maintenance.

Get Regular Professional Maintenance

Hiring a professional to help keep things running smoothly is essential to keep your HVAC system healthy and running efficiently. Most problems and home HVAC maintenance can easily be completed DIY, but a competent professional has the knowledge and experience to run more complex fixes. The technician will have the tools and equipment to handle the hazardous coolant and diagnose any air leakages or electrical problems. A professional inspection will find signs of trouble well before they happen, saving you thousands in repair or replacement costs. They should inspect the blower motor, refrigerant levels and observe the thermostat to ensure the proper operation and can make recommendations as needed.

Staying on top of your HVAC maintenance will save you time, money and hassle as well as create a true home that is comfortable and welcoming. Spend some time at the beginning of each season to go through the recommended maintenance and the “heart” of your family’s home, as well as your pocketbook, will thank you.

The Trick to Lowering Energy Costs With Regular HVAC Maintenance

Proper maintenance of your HVAC system is essential to the normal everyday function of your business. By making sure there is proper and regular maintenance performed on your HVAC unit, you can dramatically improve the efficiency and save on your energy costs. Regular maintenance will also help you to avoid and expensive repairs and replacements. The following regular maintenance steps that your HVAC contractor can do for you will help you extend the life of your HVAC system.

Change Your Air Filters Regularly

One of the most cost effective steps that you can do to help lower your energy costs is to change your air filters regularly. Your HVAC filters help to keep dust, dirt and allergens out of the air circulating throughout your building. By changing these filters regularly or having your HVAC contractor do it for you, you can help to keep your HVAC system running cleaner and more efficiently.

Check Your Fan Regularly

During the normal operation of your HVAC unit, the fan that circulates the air throughout your building can become loose due to the cumulative effects of vibration. Whenever you change your filters or have them changed for you, your HVAC contractor will make sure to check your fan to be sure that it is working properly.

Have Your Fan Blades Cleaned Regularly

Your HVAC contractor should also check the vacuum and blower area of your HVAC unit. They will be able to properly clean the fan blades and remove any build up of dust, dirt or other debris that may be causing extra strain on your HVAC unit’s motor. Proper and regular cleaning can help to keep your fan balanced and maintain efficiency for your HVAC system.

Have Your Blower Motor Oiled Regularly

Your HVAC contractor can keep your fan motor oiled and running smoothly if it requires it. Depending on the HVAC blower motor, it may be sealed and may not require regular oiling. Your HVAC contractor can help you determine whether your blower motor requires this.

By having a professional HVAC contractor take care of your HVAC unit for you, you will be able to lower your energy costs, extend the life of your system and lower your maintenance costs. Waiting until something is broken down is not only more stressful but more costly than regular maintenance from your HVAC service provider. By making sure you are having professional and regular maintenance on your HVAC system, you will be sure to have one less thing to stress over when it comes to running all of the many operations that your business or organization requires. At a minimum, be sure that you have an HVAC maintenance service inspect your HVAC unit. If your facility has a combination heating and cooling unit, be sure to have it checked at least every quarter.

Learn The Different Parts of Your Air Conditioning System

Home air-conditioning systems seem way too complicated to understand. Furnaces are much easier to understand for most of us – they heat up the air and filter it into your home through your ductwork. Your boilers create steam and hot water and then they relocate it around your house via pipes. But how in the world do air-conditioning systems create dehumidified, cool air when the outside temperature is high? In order to fully understand your air-conditioning system, you must go back to some basic principles your learned about in your school physics courses: the scientific law that as gas continues to cool, it slowly expands in volume.

What are the main components of an air-conditioning system?

There are 5 main components that go into any air-conditioning system and they must all work properly in order to have a fully-functioning air-conditioning unit.

The Refrigerant

We often refer to the refrigerant as the “blood” of the system, which is pumped through tubes within the air-conditioning unit. While it is moving through these specialized tubes, the refrigerant changes from a gas vapor to a liquid due to the heat it collects from your house, and then it ejects that heat outdoors. Refrigerant has a very low boiling point, which means that it changes from liquid to vapor at low temperatures. This refrigerant is moved around the air-conditioning system via a compressor.

The Compressor

Since we refer to the refrigerant as “blood”, we can therefore, think of the compressor as the “heart” of the system. It continuously pumps the refrigerant through a large copper loop. This allows the refrigerant to enter into the compressor (or heart) as a warm, low-pressure vapor, and leave as a hot, high-pressure vapor.

The Condenser

Now that the refrigerant is a hot, high-pressure vapor, via the compressor, it moves into the condenser, which is then cooled down. Condenser coils have small metal fins on them that draw heat from the coils. The condenser fan blows air on the fins, which helps the vapor cool down. Due to this cooling, the refrigerant is converted into a hot liquid, and then moves into the expansion valve.

The Expansion Valve

Now we get to the main way the refrigerant is cooled; the expansion valve. Now that the refrigerant is a hot liquid, it passes through the valve at very high pressure, and then comes out as a cool mist. This is able to happen due to the fact that, as the gas continues to expand, it naturally cools down.

The Evaporator Coil

The final part of the air-conditioning unit cycle happens in the evaporator coil. Low-pressure liquid is now led to the evaporator coil, which is located in your furnace. This is where the warmer air inside blows onto the evaporator coil and begins to heat it up. At the same time that this heating is occurring, the coil, which is carrying the cool gas, is blown across the evaporator. The refrigerant vapor moves back to the compressor and the outdoor condensing unit, and then expands. It cools one more time, and this continues the cooling cycle.

The Difference Between Regular and Emergency Furnace Repair

Furnaces typically work without any issues, especially if they are less than 3 years old.  Regular maintenance decreases the likeliness of running into a trouble with your furnace as well.  However, there may be times where a furnace just isn’t working right, so it is important to understand the difference between a regular furnace repair need and an emergency repair need.

If you live in the Tri-state, you understand what kind of emergencies can occur in the dead of winter.  There are instances in which you may be in need of emergency furnace repair or system replacement.  With some general investigation, you should be able to determine whether your furnace only needs some minor attention, or if it will take a licensed expert to solve the problem.

How To Know If You Should Call In A Professional

1. The Problem Seems to be With the Electrical Components

Electrical components play a vital role in how your entire home functions.  You are reliant on the electrical system in your home to provide power you need to continuously run your heating or cooling systems.

If your lights flicker when your system is running, it may be a good indicator that it is time to call a professional to come diagnose your unit.  A solid understanding of even the basics of your electrical system can provide you with the knowledge you need to spot potential hazards, but you should still consult a professional.

View the video below if you’d like to see some basic information about every home’s electrical system and also basic electrical system safety.

ESFI.org – Electrical Safety Foundation International, Home Electrical Safety, via Youtube

If you are uncertain about exactly what is the problem with the electrical system, do not try and repair the system yourself.  Electrical systems can be dangerous to tamper without the proper knowledge and training.

2. The Furnace System is Making Loud or/and Unusual Noises

Even when a furnace appears to be running without any issues, they can start making loud or unusual noises, seemingly out of the blue.  If you are certain the noise is coming through the ductwork, you may need to insulate your ductwork in order to bring down the noise.  If the furnace itself is to blame for the noise, it could be one of several things:

  • Pilot light is improperly adjusted
  • The blower motor lubrication ports need oiling

Sometimes, the nature of the noise can hint at what the underlying problem is.

a. Popping/Pinging Noise: This could perhaps be due to thermal expansion.  That is, the ductwork is expanding or contracting due to the change in temperature.

b. Squealing Noise: Perhaps a belt that connects the fan to the motor is slipping or may need replacement.

c. Rattling Noise: There may be loose panels that should be tightened.

d. Grinding Noise: Possibly motor bearings in need of repair.  Definitely call a service professional if this is happening to you.

3. The HVAC System is Repeatedly Turning Itself Off and On

If your issue with your furnace seems to be that it continuously turns itself off and then on, you may have a worn out air filter.  Try remember when the last time you had your air filters replaced, as that could hint at whether it actually is an air filter or not.

If the filter is new and the problem is still occurring, it may mean that your system has a more serious underlying issue.  It is recommended to call a service professional at this point, as continued use without addressing the issue could stress the compressor and lead to a mechanical failure.

 

The Single Piece of Equipment that Saves You Thousands

Do you know what a surge protector is? No, not the outlet strips that get tangled behind the television! Those are designed to manage small variations in voltage that your many household electrical items may require.

What we’re talking about are surge protectors that are more robust! Our devices affix to your HVAC unit to make sure that, if lightning strikes or there’s a sudden electrical event in your home, your unit will be protected from being damaged or destroyed. They’re important to have, because the small price you pay to protect your unit could save you thousands of dollars in repair or replacement costs.

We’re often asked: “If you’re at risk for lightning striking, wouldn’t you want your entire home protected?” If this is a major concern for your home, it may be worth the investment to have a whole-house surge protector installed. These, however, are incredibly expensive and not a viable option for many of us.

The surge protectors we offer are simple to install and affordable. They’re a simple way to protect one of the most vital components of your home.

The only catch? Once these surge protectors have done their job and successfully absorbed the electric shock headed towards your unit, they have to be replaced. That’s why recommend getting yours checked for replacement at your maintenance visits. Yours may have already protected you without you even knowing it!

Make the smart move and take advantage of our June offer! This month only, you can get $10 off up to three units. Stock up!

Have more questions about the products or services we offer? Go ahead and give us a call so that we can help you today!

The Cost of a Broken AC for Businesses

For business owners, scheduling an HVAC checkup is probably the LAST thing on your mind. But we’re here to tell you to raise it to the top of the list, because an unexpected breakdown could seriously cost your business.

Follow along to learn how.

Customer Happiness

Are you a retail space? Then you know how important customer satisfaction is. Even if a customer comes in and doesn’t buy anything, a pleasant shopping experience will encourage them to keep coming back until they find something they want to buy.

Say your system breaks down and you decide to keep the store open. Each and every customer that walks through your doors that day will be itching to get out as soon as they step in.

You don’t want that to be their memory of your store!

These retailers are innovators in the realm of creating a customer experience. Do you think they’d risk a day of providing a miserable shopping experience to their customers?

Employee Performance

If your customers are dying to leave the store, you can imagine how miserable your employees are, sitting there all day sweating it out. Do you think they’ll be perky enough to sell your product if they’re unhappy at work?

Even if you’re not in retail.

Office workers NEED to be happy in their workplace. It increases their satisfaction and actually drives your bottom line. Don’t sacrifice your employees’ comfort, even if you think the HVAC outage is only for a short period of time. The message will be clear: The boss doesn’t care about their comfort or their happiness at work.

Office Closure

If you’re being kind to both your employees and your customers and closing your doors during the HVAC breakdown, you’ll likely be facing days of unproductively and revenue loss. As a small business ourselves, we know the kind of impact that has on a business.

That’s why we’re here to remind you that scheduling regular HVAC maintenance checkups for your business is incredibly important!

And partnering with BNG to get that done will take it off your list, so that you don’t even have to worry about it.

Call us to schedule your commercial HVAC consultation today!

How Energy-Efficient Units Save Big Money

We know what you’re thinking—this is just a sales pitch for an HVAC company to sell you a new thermostat.

The truth is that we’re always reminding our customers to update their thermostats because we see, time after time, how the upgrade significantly impacts our customers’ monthly energy bills.

Here’s how:

One Size Doesn’t Fit All

With energy-efficient HVAC systems, you will find that cooling load capacities vary with the size of the house the unit is cooling.

It seems like this would be a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised to know just how many homes are fitted with HVAC units that have to work extra hard to cool a home too large or that work too hard for the smaller-sized home it serves.

Simply put, energy-efficient systems don’t waste any energy by working to cool or heat a home that doesn’t fit its capacity.

Newer, Smarter Technology

It goes without saying that these new units have been made with the most innovative materials and technology yet, but you may not know that they’ve also been made to work even more successfully with programmable and smart thermostats.

You’ve heard of programmable thermostats and smart thermostats by now, right?

If not, you should check out this blog and this blog to learn of the many ways that these tools work to ensure that your unit is as intuitive and efficient as possible.

If you currently have an old-school system, consider using this web tool to calculate the potential energy AND utility bill savings you could achieve by switching to an energy-efficient system.

Even better, you can get us to calculate your potential energy savings by conducting a home assessment.

Call us to schedule your consultation today!

Common HVAC Myths

As Halloween approaches, we see more and more of the same horrors: ghosts and ghouls roaming the earth, zombies craving brains, and people who don’t know they can leave their AC on when they leave the house! Oh the horror! If the most terrifying thing you can imagine is a ridiculously high energy bill, this post is for you. We’re going to address some of the most common HVAC myths we see.

Myth #1 You should always turn off your HVAC system when you leave the house.

While you may want to turn off your HVAC system when you’re leaving the house for more than 24 hours, it’s not necessary when you’ll be gone for a shorter period of time. In fact, turning your HVAC off and on could be costing you more! HVAC systems work to cool or heat your home to a pre-selected temperature. Your home’s insulation helps to keep the heated or cooled air in your home, and keep outdoor temperatures out. Turning off your HVAC system every time you leave the house, especially in extreme temperatures, makes your system work harder and against your insulation to get your house to the appropriate temperature. A better idea is to adjust your thermostat by 5 to 10 degrees when you leave. If you have a programmable thermostat, this is even easier, because your thermostat will automatically adjust to those temperatures. If you have it set to 88 degrees during the day, for example, you can set it to start lowering as you’re leaving work. Your home will be the perfect temperature when you get home!

Myth #2 Setting your fan to “On” is better than “Auto”.

Your HVAC system comes with those two settings, ‘on’ and ‘auto’, but many aren’t sure of the difference since both keep your house cool. “On” is exactly what it sounds like; even after your home has reached your ideal temperature, the fan stays on, circulating that air around your home. It sounds good, but keeping your system switched “on” is a great way to run up your energy bill and wear out your system faster. We recommend keeping your unit set to “auto” in many cases, which will run the fan to circulate air until it reaches the designated temperature. The fan will then run periodically to maintain that temperature.

If you’re wondering what the “on” setting is good for now, don’t worry! It does have some specific case uses. If you need to drastically change the temperature of your home, “on” can help move the air faster, to make you more comfortable. It can also be good for allergy sufferers, since it will circulate the air more regularly, moving allergens into your HEPA filters. Finally, it’s also great when vacuuming. Since vacuuming kicks up a lot of dust, using this setting while cleaning will help that dust move into the filter- instead of settling back onto your floor!

Myth #3 Closing air vents will save you money.

This is something we see a lot of. If you close off vents to a room in your home, you won’t be heating or cooling that room, so you’ll save money, right? Actually closing off air vents can cost you more money. When you close off vents, you’re preventing air from escaping the vents, which build up pressure on those closed vents. The air pressure and subsequent attempts to recirculate that air actually make your system work harder to cool your home. Keep your vents open!

Myth #4 Having a service subscription is a waste of money.

This is absolutely not true! Just imagining the inconvenience, frustration, and repair costs when your system goes out unexpectedly (and it always goes out when you need it most!) should be enough to convince you otherwise. The cost of most service agreements are marginal when compared to the costs of having to replace your unit when it goes out. Most issues that call for the entire unit to be replaced can be avoided with regularly scheduled maintenance to your HVAC unit.